The fight is on

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Parliament Buildings and Peace Tower in Ottawa Canada against a blue sky and white clouds.

Assuming at the time of writing that the polls have proven correct and Jason Kenney is the new premier of Alberta, it is our fervent wish that the UCP now aim full bore at the federal Liberals and a prime minister who has done more to alienate prairie Canadians than when Pierre Trudeau’s National Energy Program was proposed in 1980.
But of course, like father, like son.
The sheer hypocrisy of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his government, claiming support for Alberta’s energy industry all the while doing their utmost to handcuff it. Thousands in the energy industry in Alberta are unemployed, Alberta’s oil resources are grounded in a fight over a pipeline and still the Trudeau Liberals pound away at us with a proposed tanker ban on the northern west coast that will have very serious implications for Alberta and another bill that will overhaul the approval process for major infrastructure projects.
A recent report shows that $100 billion in planned spending for resource projects in Canada has evaporated and even more bad news is expected if Bill C-69 goes ahead. Hell will freeze over before any major project gets built in this country.
How has a nation once proud of those who risked everything to build an empire ripe with vast reserves of oil and gas, lumber and minerals now find itself with those who would forsake the memory of these men and their work to build this great country because of a shortsighted vision sprinkled with platitudes about something they know very little about?
We can point to comments from one Mike Layton, a Toronto city councilor and son of former ND leader Jack Layton, who recently suggested his city should sue oil companies for their impact on climate change. No doubt he later drove home.
And there are others–many others–who for some reason can’t see the forest for the trees.
There is no doubt that climate change is real and it will one day have a devastating effect on mankind if we don’t make some serious adjustments in the next few years. But to say this minute that we should leave Alberta’s resources in the ground and all move to renewable energy sources tomorrow is disingenuous–and impossible.
Canada’s energy producers are very aware that it is important to produce their products responsibly with as little impact on the environment as possible.
It is also very important that Canada help to meet the global demand for energy that is expected to increase by 27 per cent by 2040. Currently there are a billion people in the world without electricity and three times this number who burn wood or other products to cook.
Canada’s natural gas is drastically needed to take the place of coal-fired power generation in China and southeast Asia.
The issue is a global one and not just Canadian. We produce a minute amount of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions and we have the wherewithal to make a huge impact in offsetting emissions in the rest of the world. We must get emission credits for this.
We need people with vision to run this country and not those who can’t fathom that our resources are necessary to help the more than three billion people in the world who burn wood or cow dung to cook their meals to say nothing of replacing the millions of tonnes of coal burned each year.
Albertans are up to the challenge. We just need certain people to get out of the way.